Boeing 737 Max 8 planes blamed for two  passenger jet crashes flown to Alice Springs


Boeing 737 Max 8 planes blamed for two passenger jet crashes in five months are flown to Alice Springs to avoid monsoon damage

  • Alice Springs storage facility is to house six of the grounded 737 Max 8 planes
  • First of six Silk Air planes arrived at Alice Springs Airport after leaving Singapore
  • Low humidity of the storage facility will preserve the planes until reactivation 
  • Model grounded globally after two crashes in five months killing 346 people 

An Australian storage facility is set to house six 737 Max 8 planes in long-term storage – the model involved in two mass casualty crashes in the past year.

The model has been grounded globally since March after two of the Boeing passenger jets crashed in Indonesia and Ethiopia within five months of each other.

The first of six Max 8 planes owned by Singaporean airline Silk Air arrived on Monday at the site at Alice Springs Airport after aviation authorities gave the all-clear.

An Australian ‘plane graveyard’ is set to house six 737 Max 8 planes in long-term storage – the model involved in two mass casualty crashes in the past year (site at Alice Springs pictured)

In order for the ban to be lifted on the models the plane had to fly to Australia without any passengers and with the MCAS system disabled, news.com.au reported.

The controversial feature has been blamed for both crashes – pushing the noses of the planes down based on faulty sensor readings.

Managing director of Asia Pacific Aircraft Storage Tom Vincent said the company’s facility was ideal for preserving aircraft while they were out of service. 

‘The aircraft are being positioned here due to the climactic conditions in Alice Springs – predominantly a low-humidity environment,’ he told ABC News.

‘It’s ideal conditions for preserving the asset of the aircraft … minimising corrosion and other issues.’

The transporting of the planes to central Australia comes as the wet season begins in south-east Asia, which would risk structural damage to the aircraft.

While the jets are under their care, the Australian company will preserve the aircraft before eventually working to reactivate it once it can return to operation.

While the jets are under their care, the Australian company will preserve the aircraft before eventually working to reactivate it once it can return to operation (site pictured)

While the jets are under their care, the Australian company will preserve the aircraft before eventually working to reactivate it once it can return to operation (site pictured)

The two crashes in March of this year and October of 2018 killed 346 people – everyone on board both flights.

The first, a Lion Air flight, crashed into the Java Sea on October 29, while Ethiopian Airlines flight 302 crashed to the ground on March 10 after nose-diving at speed shortly after take-off.

After the global grounding, Boeing announced it was making changes to the Max’s flight-control computers and rewriting software that mistakenly activated on the two flights.

The plane manufacturer has already agreed to pay out USD$144,500 (AUD$215,000) to each of the families of the 346 people killed in the two crashes.

The two crashes in March of this year and October of 2018 killed 346 people - everyone on board both flights (Ethiopian Airlines crash site pictured)

The two crashes in March of this year and October of 2018 killed 346 people – everyone on board both flights (Ethiopian Airlines crash site pictured)

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