Monkeying around for the camera: Primates strike a pose for hilarious close-up portraits


Monkeying around for the camera: Primates strike a pose for hilarious close-up portraits

  • Stunning photos show two proboscis monkeys, with one mediating while the other looks deep in thought
  • Others show a black crested macaque giving a toothy grin in Indonesia – and an adorable snow monkey
  • Images were taken by photographer Mogens Trolle, 50, from Denmark, as part of his photo series Eye Contact
  • The photographs came about after he spent a year in South Africa capturing the unique animals on camera

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Hilarious close up portraits of some of the world’s most unusual primates show their uncanny resemblance to humans.

The stunning series of photographs show two proboscis monkeys, with one appearing to mediate while the other looks deep in thought as it rests its face on its hand in Sabah, Borneo.

Other shots show a black crested macaque giving a toothy smile in Sulawesi, Indonesia, and an adorable snow monkey sticking its tongue out to taste the falling snowflakes in Jigokudani, Japan.

Hilarious close up portraits of some of the world's most unusual primates show their uncanny resemblance to humans. Pictured: A black crested macaque showing its teeth in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia

Hilarious close up portraits of some of the world’s most unusual primates show their uncanny resemblance to humans. Pictured: A black crested macaque showing its teeth in Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia

The stunning series of photographs show two proboscis monkeys, with one appearing to mediate

Another looks deep in thought as it rests its face on its hand in Sabah, Borneo

The stunning series of photographs show two proboscis monkeys, with one appearing to mediate (left), while the other looks deep in thought as it rests its face on its hand (right) in Sabah, Borneo

Other shots show a black crested macaque giving a toothy smile in Sulawesi, Indonesia, and an adorable snow monkey sticking its tongue (pictured) out to taste the falling snowflakes in Baima Snow Mountain National Nature Reserve, Yunnan, China

Other shots show a black crested macaque giving a toothy smile in Sulawesi, Indonesia, and an adorable snow monkey sticking its tongue (pictured) out to taste the falling snowflakes in Baima Snow Mountain National Nature Reserve, Yunnan, China

The images were taken by photographer Mogens Trolle, 50, from Denmark, as part of his photo series Eye Contact.

The snaps came about after he spent a year in South Africa capturing animals on camera.

Mr Trolle has included primates from Gabon, Ethiopia, Vietnam, Borneo, Sulawesi, China, Africa and Japan in his series.

The images were taken by photographer, Mogens Trolle, 50, from Denmark, as part of his photo series Eye Contact. Pictured: A red-shanked douc alpha male hunches over in Son Tra Nature Reserve, Vietnam

The images were taken by photographer, Mogens Trolle, 50, from Denmark, as part of his photo series Eye Contact. Pictured: A red-shanked douc alpha male hunches over in Son Tra Nature Reserve, Vietnam

The snaps came about after Mr Trolle spent a year in South Africa capturing animals on camera. Pictured: A Japanese macaque tasting snowflakes in Jigokudani, Japan

The snaps came about after Mr Trolle spent a year in South Africa capturing animals on camera. Pictured: A Japanese macaque tasting snowflakes in Jigokudani, Japan

A black crested macaque giving a toothy smile at the Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia

A Gelada, also known as a bleeding-heart monkey, looks away from the camera in the Simien Mountains, Ethiopia

A black crested macaque giving a toothy smile at the Tangkoko Nature Reserve, Sulawesi, Indonesia (left), as a Gelada, also known as a bleeding-heart monkey, looks away from the camera in the Simien Mountains, Ethiopia (right)

He likes to photograph the animals when they are relaxed, as he believes this is when they start opening up to him.

He said: ‘I was becoming more and more drawn to taking portraits of animals. I wanted to get closer to them, get to know them better, see their eyes and see their personality.

‘Photographing primates was a natural next step. 

An orangutan mother and her baby look lovingly at each other in Tanjung Puting, Kalimantan, Borneo. Mr Trolle he likes to photograph the animals when they are relaxed, as he believes this is when they start opening up to him

An orangutan mother and her baby look lovingly at each other in Tanjung Puting, Kalimantan, Borneo. Mr Trolle he likes to photograph the animals when they are relaxed, as he believes this is when they start opening up to him

An orangutan male staring directly into the lens in Tanjung Puting, Kalimantan, Borneo

A mandrill alpha male poses for the camera in Gabon, Central Africa

An orangutan male staring directly into the lens in Tanjung Puting, Kalimantan, Borneo (left), and a mandrill alpha male poses for the camera in Gabon, Central Africa (right)

‘Like us humans, they communicate a lot with their facial expressions and eyes and I think they are the most expressive animals.

‘I try to capture special looks that show the individuality of each animal. Each species has their own characteristics.’

Mr Trolle added: ‘Often my photos show expressions that are very similar to human expressions.’



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